I had a farm in Africa

out-of-africa

image source : From Isi, WordPress.com

“I had a farm in Africa, at the foot of the Ngong Hills. The Equator runs across these highlands, a hundred miles to the north, and the farm lay at an altitude of over six thousand feet. In the day-time you felt that you had got up high, near the sun, but the early mornings and evenings were limpid and restful, and the nights were cold.

The geographical position and the height of the land combined to create a landscape that had not its like in all the world. There was no fat on it and no luxuriance anywhere; it was Africa distilled up through six thousand feet, like the strong and refined essence of a continent. The colours were dry and burnt, like the colours of pottery. The trees had a light delicate foliage, the structure of which was different from that of the trees in Europe; it did not grow in bows or cupolas, but in horizontal layers, and the formation gave the tall solitary tress a likeness to the palms, or a heroic and romantic air like full-rigges ships with their sails furled, and to the edge of a wood a strange appearance as if the whole wood were faintly vibrating. Upon the grass of the great plains the crooked bare old thorn-trees were scattered, and the grass was spiced like thyme and bog-myrtles; in some places the scent was so strong that it smarted in the nostrils. All the flowers that you found on the plains or upon the creepers and liana in the native forest, were diminutive like flowers of the downs – only just in the beginning of the long rains a number of big, massive heavy-scented lilies sprang out on the plains. The views were immensely wide. Everything you saw made for greatness and freedom and unequalled nobility.

The chief feature of the landscape, and of your life in it was the air. Looking back on a sojourn in the African highlands, you are struck by your feeling of having lived for a time up in the air. The sky was rarely more than pale blue or violet, with a profusion of mighty, whiteness, ever-changing clouds towering up and sailing on it, but it has a blue vigour in it and at a short distance it painted the ranges of hills in the woods a fresh deep blue. In the middle of the day, the air was alive over the land, like a flame burning; it scintillated, waved and shone like running water, mirrored and doubled all objects, and created great Fata Morgana. Up in this high air you breathed easily, drawing in vital assurance and lightness of heart. In the highlands you woke up in the morning and thought : Here I am, where I ought to be”.

Out of Afica, incipit, Karen Blixen 1937.

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Iguana – Karen Blixen Out of Africa

Out of Africa, by Karen Blixen

Salamander

Salamander

Once I killed an iguana. I was rejoicing in advance, thinking of everything I could do with its skin. I then saw something I will never forget.

As I walked through the twenty steps that separated it from me, I saw it wither before my eyes as if all it’s shine expired in a long breath, and when I got to touch it it was just a lump of cement, grey and dull.

It is the blood that runs under its skin that gives this magnificent shine. Once the flamme has been put out, and the soul has flown away it does no longer exist: it becomes a lump of sand”.

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Xsalamandra

Salamander

“J’ai  tué une fois un iguane, je me réjouissais à l’avance de tout ce que je pourrais faire de sa peau, et je fus témoin d’un phénomène que je n’ai jamais oublié.

Pendant que je franchissais les quelques vingt mètres qui le séparaient de moi, je le vis se faner sous mes yeux, comme si tout son éclat s’exhalait en un long soupir, et lorsque je pus le toucher, ce n’était plus d’un bloc de ciment, gris mat.

C’est le sang qui court sous la peau de la bête qui lui donne son merveilleux éclat.

Lorsque la flamme s’est éteinte et l’âme envolée, l’iguane n’existe pas plus qu’un tas de sable”.

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